Home Magazine Resources Store

Current Issue



Keep up to date with all things astronomy related with Astronomy Now magazine, which includes the UK's biggest and best night sky guide, an extensive news section, readers' astronomical images, book and equipment reviews, feature articles, a beginners' section and much more. For a sneak preview of this month's issue go to our magazine page.





NewsAlert



Sign up for our NewsAlert service and have the latest space news e-mailed direct to your desktop.

Enter your e-mail address:

Privacy note: your e-mail address will not be used for any other purpose.



Shuttle Movies




The most complete source of video from the countdown, launch and mission of space shuttle Discovery is available here! Spaceflight Now's STS-121 archive includes more than 200 movies you can watch online or download to your computer.

Video Collection



News Archive

2012: Jan  Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun  Jul  Aug  Sep  Oct  Nov  Dec

2011: Jan  Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun  Jul  Aug  Sep  Oct  Nov  Dec

2010: Jan  Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun  Jul  Aug  Sep  Oct  Nov  Dec

2009: Jan  Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun  Jul  Aug  Sep  Oct  Nov Dec

2008: Jan  Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun  Jul  Aug  Sep  Oct  Nov  Dec

2007: Jan  Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun  Jul  Aug  Sep  Oct  Nov  Dec

2006: Jan  Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun  Jul  Aug  Sep  Oct  Nov  Dec

2005: Jan  Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun  Jul  Aug  Sep  Oct  Nov  Dec

2004: Jan  Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun  Jul  Aug  Sep  Oct  Nov  Dec

Back to latest news
Download magazine article indices

News: September 2010

Goldilocks exoworld discovered

One of two new planets discovered in the Gliese 581 system is three Earth masses and lies square in the middle of the star's habitable zone, boosting its chances of hosting conditions suitable for life.

READ MORE

 

Pan-STARRS finds potentially hazardous asteroid

The latest asteroid hunting survey, the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS, or PS1), has found its first potentially hazardous object.

READ MORE

 

Analysis of Hayabusa samples will wait until 2011

Scientists won't know whether Japan's Hayabusa probe actually returned asteroid dust until at least February or March, when researchers finish extracting microscopic particles from the craft's return capsule and complete an exhaustive analysis to verify their origin.

READ MORE

 

An alien's view
of our Solar System

New computer simulations that track the interactions of thousands of dust grains show what our Solar System might look like to extra-terrestrials.

READ MORE

 

Shining light on
dark stellar cocoons

By studying light that has bounced off dark stellar dust clouds, astronomers are gleaning new information on the earliest phases of star formation.

READ MORE

 

Cassini scoops Saturn's aurora

A stunning animation of Saturn's aurora created from 1,000 images, and the first observations from within the planet's radio aurora, were presented today at the European Planetary Science Congress.

READ MORE

 

Magnetic anomalies
shield the Moon

Evidence for magnetic anomalies strongly deflecting the solar wind from the lunar surface was presented at the European Planetary Science Congress today.

READ MORE

 

Venus polar vortex
all shook up

New animations created from ESA's Venus Express mission show striking changes in the vortex that rides around the planet's south pole, its double-eyed feature currently absent.

READ MORE

 

'Hide-and-seek' carbon dioxide ice uncovered

The strange disappearance of carbon dioxide ice in early martian spring followed by its sudden reappearance is explained by the planet's very active water cycle, and strong winds, say scientists presenting their findings at the European Planetary Science Congress this week.

READ MORE

 

Venus' lightning
similar to Earth's

Despite the huge differences between Venus' and Earth's atmospheres, data from ESA's Venus Express satellite finds that the planets produce lightning in surprisingly similar ways.

READ MORE

 

Rosetta looks south
for landing site

A new study of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko reveals that the southern hemisphere of the comet will present the safest landing site for ESA's Rosetta mission to deliver its lander, Philae.

READ MORE

 

Seasons of change on Titan

Using some 2,000 Cassini images, planetary scientists are putting together a picture of Titan's seasons, which last seven Earth years.

READ MORE

 

Amateur astronomer teams up with ESO and Faulkes

As part of a collaboration with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the Faulkes Telescope South (FTS), Astronomy Now contributor and amateur astronomer Nick Howes has imaged stars in the massive star cluster Westerlund 1.

READ MORE

 

Phobos born
from Mars impact

New evidence from ESA's Mars Express and NASA's Mars Global Surveyor missions supports the idea that martian moon Phobos was born from a catastrophic impact on the surface of the red planet.

READ MORE

 

Seasonal changes
in Mars' methane

Using three martian years worth of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) data, scientists presenting their results at the European Planetary Science Congress in Rome this week find that methane in the red planet's atmosphere follows an annual cycle.

READ MORE

 

Venus' hot atmosphere
cools its interior

A new computer model finds that heat in Venus' hot atmosphere could have led to a cooling effect within the planet's interior.

READ MORE

 

Jupiter's close approach

Jupiter steals the show this week as it reaches opposition, and its closest approach to the Earth since 1963.

READ MORE

 

LRO exposes Moon's
complex youth

Three papers featuring in the current issue of the journal Science describe new findings from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) on the Moon's tumultuous history.

READ MORE

 

3D simulations show asymmetric supernovae

New 3D simulations of supernova explosions take astronomers a step closer to understanding the most powerful events in the Universe.

READ MORE

 

BP Piscium's identity crisis

A star that displays a gaseous disc and a pair of jets blasting out of it, typical characteristics of a young star, could in fact be more evolved than our own Sun.

READ MORE

 

Liquid water and volcanic activity on Mars

Data from NASA’s Phoenix Lander has revealed surprising insights into the past geological and chemical composition of Mars.

READ MORE

 

Supernova shrapnel
found in meteorite

Traces of an ancient supernova event have been identified in a meteorite, explaining the curious chemical fingerprints found in the rock.

READ MORE

 

Hot Earths have atmospheres of rock

Hot rocky exoplanets may have atmospheres of vapourised rock, says Brian Jackson of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Centre, USA at the Exoclimes conference at the University of Exeter.

READ MORE

 

Mapping new worlds

Mapping the surface of an exoplanet, or even the cloud tops of a turbulent gaseous hot jupiter, is possible even if we cannot capture direct images of the planets themselves, revealed astronomers at this week’s Exoclimes conference.

READ MORE

 

Detecting alien volcanoes

Astronomers using the future James Webb Space Telescope could potentially detect volcanic activity on distant Earth-like exoplanets, say Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics theorists.

READ MORE

 

Spiral galaxies grow by swallowing dwarfs

A new survey, based on deep-field observations of spiral and dwarf galaxies, has provided a deeper insight into the growth of spiral galaxies.

READ MORE

 

Hot jupiters kick up a storm

Intense heat from the nearby star of a hot Jupiter is creating turbulent storms that envelope the entire planet.

READ MORE

 

Methane mystery
on Gliese 436b

Observations by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope of light from the exoplanet Gliese 436b have identified an atmosphere filled with carbon monoxide but exhibiting a puzzling lack of methane, says Professor Joseph Harrington at the Exoclimes conference at the University of Exeter this week.

READ MORE

 

Two asteroids
approach Earth

Two small asteroids will pass the Earth this week, within the distance of the Moon.

READ MORE

 

Pro-am collaborations crucial for Jupiter studies

Amateur observations of Jupiter are of vital importance to professional astronomers working to figure out the mysteries of the Jovian atmosphere, says Dr Leigh Fletcher of the University of Oxford, who gave a presentation about recent activity on the giant planet at the Exoclimes conference in Exeter this week.

READ MORE

 

Hot titans would be
Venus like worlds

A planetary scientist from the University of Michigan suggests that astronomers could in the future look for hot versions of Saturn’s moon Titan around other stars.

READ MORE

 

Just add starlight!

A giant cloud of hot water vapour surrounding a dying star can only be explained by the interaction of ultraviolet starlight breaking down molecules, according to new data from ESA's Herschel space observatory.

READ MORE

 

Starbursts and superwinds

A new visible light image from ESO captures a galaxy bursting with star formation and expelling a 'superwind' of gas.

READ MORE

 

Colliding clusters turn on radio halos

A study of 32 galaxy clusters using the Chandra Space Observatory and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) shows that collisions between clusters trigger huge radio halos.

READ MORE

 
 

Back to latest news

2010 Yearbook
Our latest 132-page Astronomy Now special edition is an extravaganza of astronomy for the year ahead, with a complete 30-page guide to observing the planets, moon, meteor showers, two solar eclipses, and the deep sky in 2010.
 U.K. STORE
 E.U. STORE
 U.S. & WORLDWIDE STORE
 

Take the tour!
A 100-page special edition from the creators of Astronomy Now magazine, The Grand Tour of the Universe takes readers from one end of the Universe to the other and, in doing so, asks the question "just how big is the Universe?"
 U.K. STORE
 E.U. STORE
 U.S. & WORLDWIDE STORE


Infinity Rising
This special publication features the photography of British astro-imager Nik Szymanek and covers a range of photographic methods from basic to advanced. Beautiful pictures of the night sky can be obtained with a simple camera and tripod before tackling more difficult projects, such as guided astrophotography through the telescope and CCD imaging.
 U.K. STORE
 E.U. STORE
 U.S. & WORLDWIDE STORE

Guide to the Constellations
Astronomy Now presents this 100-page, full-colour guide to the 68 constellations visible from the British Isles by Neil Bone, the respected amateur astronomer and writer.
 U.K. STORE
 E.U. STORE
 U.S. & WORLDWIDE STORE

Exploring Mars
Astronomy Now is pleased to announce the publication of Exploring Mars. The very best images of Mars taken by orbiting spacecraft and NASA's Spirit and Opportunity rovers fill up the 98 glossy pages of this special edition!
 U.K. STORE
 E.U. STORE
 U.S. & WORLDWIDE STORE


HOME | NEWS ARCHIVE | MAGAZINE | SOLAR SYSTEM | SKY CHART | RESOURCES | STORE | SPACEFLIGHT NOW

© 2014 Pole Star Publications Ltd.