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Interactive Sky Chart British Isles
Select period: Select month: Select time: Summer Time? 

Eye on the Sky

 QUICK LOOK WHAT'S UP
 SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE SKY

 GUIDE TO SOLAR OBSERVING

The Planets
From tiny Mercury to distant Neptune and Pluto, The Planets profiles each of the Solar System's members in depth, featuring the latest imagery from space missions. The tallest mountains, the deepest canyons, the strongest winds, raging atmospheric storms, terrain studded with craters and vast worlds of ice are just some of the sights you'll see on this 100-page tour of the planets.
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Hubble Reborn
Hubble Reborn takes the reader on a journey through the Universe with spectacular full-colour pictures of galaxies, nebulae, planets and stars as seen through Hubble's eyes, along the way telling the dramatic story of the space telescope, including interviews with key scientists and astronauts.
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3D Universe
Witness the most awesome sights of the Universe as they were meant to be seen in this 100-page extravaganza of planets, galaxies and star-scapes, all in 3D!
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How to use the interactive Sky Chart
Use the pull-down menus above the star chart to select, in turn, the period of observation (either early or late in the month), the desired month, and the time of the chart to be drawn. Note that the checkbox labelled 'Summer Time?' should have a tick in it if British Summer Time is in effect for the date in question. Clicking the 'DISPLAY CHART' button will then calculate how the sky will look for you. Obviously, if you select a chart showing the sky for the early evening in June, then the Sun will still be up!

Finding your way around
Find a place to stargaze, preferably away from the glare of artificial lights. Look south (the Sun sets approximately to your right). By holding the sky chart with north at the top in front of you, the lower half of the map will represent the part of the sky you are facing. Looking north, turn the map upside down, so that south is at the top; again, the lower half of the map will represent the part of the sky you are facing. And so on for other points of the compass. The centre of the chart always represents the point overhead, or the zenith.

What's up this month?

Keep your eye on the sky each month with our handy table of stellar and planetary phenomena. If you require precise lunar and planetary positions from your U.K. location, be sure to visit our Solar System page and its interactive planetary data table.

Weekly guide

For an in-depth look at Solar System and Deep Sky objects each week, check out our new weekly guide to the night sky.

 

Slideshow